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, a big thank-you to the staff, without mean, this would not have been possible, as usual. thank you very much for all you did. [applause] let me just say, we have a lot of work to do. let's make hay with the sunshine. those involved in the press conference, could you please go immediately to grand ballroom be because we are late. [laughter] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> wrapping up this session of the national governors' association from salt lake city. we just heard from washington state governor, the chair for this summer's conference. we will have more events throughout the weekend. tomorrow afternoon o'clock 30, the session on remembering 9/11, protecting borders and communities. on sunday at 1:30, the closing session. you will also be able to find all the segments on line in their entirety at c-span.org -- online in their entirety at c- span.org. it >> this weekend, live from salt lake city, the nation's governors look at the net the -- lessons of 9/11, and the featured speaker talks competitivenes
choices today -- do we want to keep repeating ourselves or do we want to look at the big car rise in and do inspirational things we have already challenged ourselves to do? my generation, together with those that followed, built the isf. today anash @ -- nasa and the others want to touch an asteroid and move to mars. the status quo is no longer exceptional. -- acceptable. the students and early career scientist had a ton of energy and enthusiasm. they are excited about the chance to do something new, to be it on the ground floor of the next big frontier of human exploration. to put their big ideas into practice, and they should be. if you are studying in a stems discipline today, you love a great career ahead you, not just at nasa but at other government agencies and academia. when that final shuttle landing occurs, and the cheers and jeers subside, we will keep on moving to where we want to go next. your kids and my grandkids will do things that today we can barely dreamed of. our nation has made great progress the west's history by innovating solutions to meet grand challenges,
chart has given a lot over the years. we call it the big shot. in the last few years, change has happened in terms of the long-term stability, brief moments of disturbance, changes in 60 years of stability. we reinvented work practices and other practices. what has happened now is in the last 10 years, we are moving to a different kind of infrastructure proven by the digital loss of competition. now we find having a world in which we have constant disruption nearly every year. the challenge is how do you start to leverage that rather than fear that in terms of driving innovation in? it will not slow down for the next 30 or 40 years. let me say this personally. i can recapitulate the last 10 years of my life. it took me from this class to cloud computing come into graphic processing, that is scientific computing a fraction of the cost, now into a very limited form of competing. i have had to relearn almost everything i knew as a computer scientist. dealing with the plains regarding amazon and microsoft. i had to think about how to move these processing units. there are single proc
on energy prices. by the way, there was a big argument on at in "the economist." what has happened is, information technology greatly increase liquidity has transformed that. there is not a consensus within the financial pages that people talk about the impact of speculation. it is a given. republicans are trying to keep them from doing anything about speculation. those are the had on a tax that we have. there is a more subtle one, this attack on a risk retention. i believe that risk retention is the single most important piece of this bill. you know, the response when we used to say there was a problem, what was supposed to be the substitute for risk retention -- the rating agencies. the rating agencies were the ones. you did not need to have the latter worry about this because you could go ask the rating region -- agencies. now, the rating agencies are trying to overdo it. the people who told us that subprime loans were good are now telling us that it is not good. i think they were wrong in both times. that is one of the things that i really wanted to address now. it does of all me
went to that were big money because i grew up in a middle-class home, it cost $22,000 to go, you played tennis and eight food. host: there are pictures this morning that showed a couple of scenes from inside the white house. this is from "the washington post." this is a picture of first lady betty ford and her daughter susan. the description says, "the first lady and daughter susan killed time and the president's office in 1975. in 1980, the pair lost national breast cancer awareness month. mrs. ford became an awareness for early detection. " there's a picture for 1979 and this shows mrs. ford said in a longtime -- alongside liza minnelli and liza minnelli at studio 54. the next one shows mrs. ford, that she was quite the denser and loved to do so. those pictures are all found in "the washington post"this morning. we're talking about the passing of betty ford died yesterday. we are taking your comments and tweets on the subject. new york, republican line, go ahead. caller: good morning. i want to say a few things. i thought betty ford was very innovative and incredibly supportive and sh
for the tabloids. host: what about the broadsheets? guest: it is known occasionally. there was a big scandal about mp's expenses last year, which came from information that is the voice of -- information that is the will serve and got on a computer disk. my newspaper paid for that because they thought it was in the public interest. that is a rare instance of a broadsheet paper paying for information. for the tabloids, we call it checkbook journalism. salacious information about a night out on the town with a celebrity or pop star or encounters with celebrities. that culture has grown and become more insidious over the past 20 or 30 years. host: how would you describe, to help put it in perspective -- by the way, we will put the numbers on the screen as we continue this conversation about the phone hacking investigation in the u.k. prime minister cameron spoke this morning at a problem about it and we carry that live on c- span -- spoke this morning in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you
us a mission with a capital "m" -- to focus again on the big picture of exploration and the crucial research and development that will be required for us to move beyond low earth orbit. he's charged us with carrying out the inspiring missions that only nasa can do, which will take us farther than we've ever been -to orbit mars and eventually land on it. he's asked us to start planning a mission to an asteroid, and right now our dawn spacecraft is approaching one of the biggest in the solar system, vesta, and we're scheduled to drop into orbit around that asteroid the middle of this month. what it finds out could help inform such a mission. the president is asking us to harness that american spirit of innovation, the drive to solve problems and create capabilities that is so embedded in our story and has led us to the moon, to great observatories, and to humans living and working in space, possibly indefinitely. that american ingenuity is alive and well, and it will fire up our economy and help us create and win the future now, but only if we put aside our differences and come togeth
on every aspect of our society to get this problem under control. >> [inaudible] >> everyone agrees a big deal with the best. the president says that. i believe that. the folks behind the believe that. we still believe it is possible to have a comprehensive proposal here that in a serious way addresses this enormous debt problem we have. i have not given up hope that that may happen yet. thanks a lot. >> a group of senate democrats held their own news conference, where they reiterated their demand that any budget agreement include more tax revenues from those making more than a million dollars a year. this news conference begins with a michigan senator. this is half an hour. >> good afternoon. on april 15, the house of representatives voted to end medicare. the wanted to use that money to balance the budget. rather than using it to balance the budget, they used it for huge new giveaways to millionaires and special interests. their plan protect spending on massive tax earmarked for drug companies, oil companies, companies that outsource jobs, and well-connected special interests. let me ju
money for a tiny wheel, about this big, the onus is on the defense department to get these costs under control. i do not think congress will just let them come especially with the budget coming down, looked the other way. host: megan scully with "national journal." and the piece is called "the pentagon premium." thank you for joining us. we will be back at 7:00 a.m. we go to the floor of the house of representatives. continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: we begin another week in political wonderland. the dow falls 100 points at the opening bell. what is it that we should do? well, if we had the knowledge and problem solving skills of college sophomore economic students or women in a church study group, before the week is out we would establish some simple steps. first, we would understand that in a divided government with real economic challenges no one group is allowed especially those representing a minority of opinion to have their way entirely. we would begin by repealing the silly debt ceiling
with the pie. [unintelligible] host: do you think that this is a big deal at all? in aer: in a way, yes, and a way, no. he is a nice man, but he is too old. it takes a man that this young to do something like that host: do you think you could run all of those companies? caller: me? i am a painter. host: i know. i have your painting in my office. caller: my wife is looking at me and telling me to tell you good morning. host: good morning. send me your e-mail address and i will send you a picture of it in profit -- in my office. caller: listen, my wife's birthday is tomorrow, she turned 81. host: that is right. you married an older woman. mr. peterson, you enjoy that heat wave in texas. we have got to get moving. we appreciate it. this would message, regarding the phone hacking scandal -- host: mike is a republican in arizona. hello. caller: i can see this going on in great britain, i guess the police are involved. but then they are doing it for us in the same manner. scanning e-mails, looking for certain words and what ever. i do not see any difference. i mean, they are exchanging inform
, it made taxpayer-funded bailouts illegal, so taxpayers don't have to foot the bill if a big bank goes under. second, it said to wall street firms, you can't take the same kind of reckless risks that led to the crisis. and third, it put in place the stronger -- the strongest consumer protections in history. now, to make sure that these protections worked - so ordinary people were dealt with fairly, so they could make informed decisions about their finances - we didn't just change the law. we changed the way the government did business. for years, the job of protecting consumers was divided up in a lot of different agencies. so if you had a problem with a mortgage lender, you called one place. if you had a problem with a credit card company, you called somebody else. it meant there were a lot of people who were responsible, but that meant nobody was responsible. and we changed that. we cut the bureaucracy and put one consumer watchdog in charge, with just one job -- looking out for regular people in the financial system. now, this is an idea that i got from elizabeth warren, who i firs
of this cut, cap, and balance. the would like a big deal as obama calls it. speaker john boehner is interested in that, but not much support in making a deal from his own caucus. willing to open his mind to a smaller deal. host: you can read more at com.olitico dot martin kady was joing us. thanks. we are looking at how this issue will be alert and impact the elections of politicians. should this make or break a congressional career? connecticut, good morning to you. caller: this is a great example of how it will have an impact on congressional careers. there are two factors. one is doing nothing, if it is presented as normal and responsible behavior, and to come up with specific cuts on the other hand and is portrayed as dangerous, republicans will pay a price, because the irresponsible behavior that got us into this. the other aspect is who do you believe? the president falsifying the health insurance aspect of his mother's cancer could be so troubling. if the president would make up false tales about what health insurance companies did or did not do for his mother, imagine what he would say
advice he can get, and what better than an editor from a big title? so, you were going to have to involve yourself at the top of the media world. otherwise, he will not survive. it has been proven you will not survive because you have to play the game and you have to deal in onion information, which means that. it is a bell making information, providing information. >> if you have someone who is working for you, who works for an organization as under investigation, surely you must smell a rat? the police officers did not do anything wrong. >> if we knew when the investigation was done, we might have the answers to that. the police actually do take action. one of the tactics is to stop complaining. the constables on the street have complaints. they investigated colby and factually. that is what has happened in this case. metropolitan police should have investigated at. -- investigated it. if they want to investigate this and be accepted as truthful and honest investigators, they have to resign. the atmosphere is no one gives them a chance to do this. >> you were involved in the running of
general. general petraeus is leaving to become director of the central intelligence agency. another big story is what is happening with rupert murdoch and his businesses. here's this picture looking at the u.k. hacking scandal and what's happening right now. he will appear before a panel of u.k. lawmakers on tuesday after the phone hacking scandal. today on c-span3 we will bring you the british house of commons at 9:30 morning where rupert murdoch will test suppor -- will testify before a committee. let's go to the phones again, phoenix, arizona, independent mind. caller: i was calling about the balanced budget amendment. we cannot have that. if you amend the constitution, that means the supreme court eventually if gets to decide what that constitutional amendment means. that means every time congress disagrees, which is constantly, if somebody will file an action, take it to federal court, the judge will make a decision, and eventually it will be determined by the supreme court of the u.s. and i don't want lawyers making that decision. that's not what our constitution intended. host: l
the prime minister agree that in the past when the house of commons has been faced with big issues that they have a tendency for knee-jerk overreactions? would you agree that newspapers are a force for good in this country and we need criminality weeded out of the media but not impose on a free speech or prepress? >> my hon. friend is entirely right. we need to make sure as the house of commons, as the government, in the debate that we have to show an element of restraint in regulation of the media because there's always a danger that the pendulum will swing too far the other way and we threaten investigative journalism, a strong and independent media that can hold government to account. when we consider some of the scandals that have been uncovered, it is often the press that does this. it is absolutely vital to maintain their british tradition. >> rebekah brooks described the prime minister as a friend and neighbor. we heard about christmas walks and conversations. >> order. this is the moment in parliament where we have a free speech. this question will be heard. that is the end
. they were not told. is it not there? he did exactly what they should not do. >> he makes a very big point. when you see what he said, he saw that it was cleared in advance. we do not live in a country or the prime minister's ordering who should be arrested. >> he made a statement on monday. there were two words that were not mentioned. we were not in a situation where his best buddy was working for us. did he know that neil wallace was giving advice? >> no. . i did not know that. i was unaware of that. i think this is important. one of the issues is the transparency and information that there was. there was no hiding the fact that they had this. >> i want to thank you for the announcement. he has said that all governments have been far too close to the media giants. that means no more back door living to no. 10. there are cabinet papers. there are recommendations for it to be implemented. >> i accept the plea make about transparency. there are of official business meetings with media executives. with relation, the fact is not whether he came in through the back or front door, but was it d
old. what are your hopes for the future? >> there's a big future. there's a deep future. the one that want for. so that is the future where we are all able to freely communicate our hearts and dreams, share information about the world with each other and the historical record is an item that is completely sack sacrosanct. it would never be changed, never be modified, never be deleted, and that we will steer of course away from the victim of he who controls the purses present controls the past. so that is something that is my life long quest to do. and from that, justice flows because most of us have an instinct for justice and most of us are reasonably intelligent. and if we can communicate with each other, organize and not be op pressed and not know what's going on pretty much the rest falls out. in the short term, it is that my staff stop hasling me to tell me to go. >> >> i wish you all the bevs another even more beautiful mission. [applause] >> here is a look at our schedule for this afternoon. next, a discussion with legal scholars on the 2010-2011 supreme court term and wha
with this question. tomorrow, at your turn 40 years old. what are your hopes for the future? >> there is a big future. that is a future where we are all able to freely communicate our hopes and dreams and the historical record is an item that is completely -- it could never be changed, deleted, modified. that is something is -- that is my lifelong quest to do. from that, justice lows. -- flows. most of us are reasonably intelligent. if we communicate with each other, organize, and know what is going 9, and that is pretty much what it is all about. in the short term, it is that my staff stopped hassling. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> the head of the national institute of health talks about science and innovation in the u.s.. the state department calls on the syrian government to withdraw troops. that briefing is later. in case you just missed it, wikileaks founder in a forum in london. >> on tomorrows "washington journal," we continue our discussion on federal spending and the national debt. after that, pe
their responsibility? there were a different part of the stable. at times that is a big outfit. famous come to the conclusion pen. they would have the overall responsibility. it would not come. >> he would have heard that this was not the tone. they have this reputation as an investigator. he got on with it. he kept his cards very close to his chest. there were below them. that dangerous men. he did not want him on the bench. and not quite sure who else i could have gone too. they performed to the best of their ability. >> you have made their own judgment on that. >> thank you. >> thank you. i feel a little bit like i have fallen through the rabbit hole. you said that in the original investigation, you noticed no stone was left unturned. we wonder why there was a decision not to have exhausted analysis of this. there is no assessment of any additional victims. can you explain your role in that position and your assessment? >> i will pick of the mood of the committee. i had no involvement in that decision. i think they also had the evidence. they with their within the parameters. >> been mad
stop making social security requirements, there would be a big crisis. at least, in that case, it would not actually lead to a default. it could adversely affect our future ability to borrow. host: republican line from pennsylvania. good morning. caller: good morning. my question is how much are we paying for people who did not really pay in to social security and did not work like these kids who are hooked on drugs, alcohol, stuff like that and are collecting s.f.i. how much money? host: i think that is out of the area of the expertise of our guest. to ocean city, new jersey. you are on the air. caller: hello. good morning, america. i kind of do not agree with the republican agenda. i just wanted to make that statement. i really feel like they want to take away benefits to people on social security, yet they give subsidies to billionaire oil companies. to me, that does not make any sense. social security is, sort of, an asset. as far as the constitution, one crazy question. we are talking about impeachment of the president. is there any way that the general public can remove members of
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20